Mon. Oct 18th, 2021


Hurricane Eder is part of the Mississippi Delta on September 3, just five days later.

A part of the Mississippi Delta on September 3, just five days after H.Eureka
Pictures: Joshua Stevens / Landsat / U.S. Geological Survey

Satellite images Taken in Louisiana before and after H.The Eureka Ida shows a dramatically altered coastline, with many low-lying areas still submerged. Scientists are carefully observing the landscape to see how it develops over time and whether some changes are permanent.

Created Hurricane Ida Landfall August 29– H’s 16th anniversaryEureka Katrina. A Category 4 storm has created havoc in Louisiana, with strong winds and heavy rainfall hitting the state. Storm waves. One of the strongest storms to hit the state of Ida, causing massive power outages, destroying homes and businesses, Damaged roads and bridges, and causes 26 Death In the state.

It has also reshaped the landscape, though we don’t know how long. Ida flows through the Mississippi Delta, a region already at risk for a permanent blockade of the Atlantic O.Wetlands are slowly shrinking and even becoming extinct as sea levels rise due to cean levis, upstream dams, and man-made climate change. Other human activities, such as pumping groundwater and oil, are contributing to this process, such as natural submergence and sedimentation of new deltas, According to At NASA’s Earth Observatory.

This satellite image of the Mississippi River was taken on September 19, 2015.

This satellite image of the Mississippi River was taken on September 19, 2015.
Pictures: Joshua Stevens / Landsat / U.S. Geological Survey

The same area that was seen on September 3, 2021, five days after Hurricane Ida swept away.

Same area as seen on September 3, 2021, Cyclone Eder swept through Eder five days later.
Pictures: Joshua Stevens / Landsat / US Geological Survey

Photographs taken from space before and after the hurricane show the changed river delta. A Landsat 8 satellite photo shows the New Orleans area as of September 19, 2015, and then as seen on September 3, 2021, Five days after Ida hit the area.

Water is seen in the sediment This lie is light blueColor pictures. Shows a natural color picture (below) of the same region This silt-filled water has an ugly brown color, especially on the northwest shores of Lake Morepas, Lake Pontertrain and Borgen Lake.

Real photos of the same region, also taken on September 3, 2021.

Real photos of the same region, also taken on September 3, 2021.
Pictures: Joshua Stevens / Landsat / US Geological Survey

The floodwaters were still present five days after the storm. Rivers, coastlines, lakes, and wetlands in Lafarge, Jefferson, and Placumine parishes are rarely recognized. A stable satellite image of Lafarge Parish near Laros Shows wet views near a low farm.

An area of ​​Lafarge Parish, near LaRos, showing a levy-protected farm.

An area of ​​Lafarge Parish, near Laros, showing a levy-protected farm.
Pictures: Joshua Stevens / Landsat / U.S. Geological Survey

“The combination of flooding, erosion and defecation during Ida probably created many new patches of open water in the Landsat image,” Mark Simard, chief investigator for NASA’s Delta-X mission, told the Earth Observatory.

The Delta-X Field Campaign along the Mississippi Delta is currently tracking changes in poly and marsh dynamics as a result of H.Eureken IDA. Later this month, when the water recedes further, the team will inspect the ground and use boats to inspect the area., In addition to the use of aerial radar.

“One of the interesting things to look at is whether the changes you see in this Landsat image prove to be temporary or permanent,” Simard said. “There may be some damage to floating plants that have been washed away or trees that have lost their seasonal leaves and will probably grow again. Others were uprooted and they will never again provide coastal protection.

The Delta-X team plans to track salinity levels to see if saline reservoirs can supply freshwater wetlands. They are also hoping for river silt flow, which could replenish eroded coastal areas and provide habitat for vegetation.

“I think we’ll see that the incoming sedimentary healthy wetlands will be much more resilient than wetlands that get little or no sediment from river discharges,” Simard said. “Our hope is that the models that Delta-X scientists are developing will give a realistic idea of ​​the region’s wetland vulnerability and resilience in the long run.”

The real word is the key word. Man-made climate change means the Mississippi Delta is now under environmental attack, and it can never come back. And of course, there is always the next cyclone to be feared.

More: Hurricane Ida is hitting Louisiana amid an outbreak of Covid-1 sur. It’s a nightmare to make.



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