Wed. Dec 1st, 2021

Holmes’ testimony is designed to reform her as an innovator who deserves to be punished for daring to try to reform a key dimension of healthcare.

By Bloomberg

Elizabeth Holmes is ready to continue the high-input game to testify in her own defense during her criminal fraud trial.

The founder of Theranos Inc. will return to the witness stand in federal court in San Jose, California, on Monday, where she surprised the courtroom late last week. Journalists and curious members of the public stood in line long before the court opened for the chance to hear Holmes himself.

Her testimony will continue where she left off Friday, describing the origins of her blood test principle while asking friendly questions from her own attorney. At first, her strategy appears to be an attempt to break the mold that prosecutors have thrown through months of testimony, of a young woman who rudely lied to powerful people in business, finance and government to achieve success and fame.

Holmes’ testimony is designed to reform her as an innovator who deserves to be punished for daring to try to reform a key dimension of healthcare. In a sense, it can be a gamble worth it. The 37-year-old Stanford University who has become an entrepreneur has already proven that she is an aggressive and convincing proponent of her company. If she could do that at Theranos, why could she not convince just one juror of her innocence? Prosecutors need a unanimous verdict to win a conviction.

But it is also a risky step. Under interrogation of her own lawyers, Holmes will have to withstand months of evidence intended to show that she has defrauded hundreds of millions of dollars of investors and endangered patients with inaccurate laboratory results. Then she will have to do the same, but under the much more intense pressure of prosecutors who are roasting her under cross-examination.

Source link

By admin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *