Facebook’s surveillance board says Trump’s ban was justified


The Philosophy Board, Facebook’s The so-called Supreme Court In a decision on moderate policy, it has decided to support / revoke the “indefinite suspension” handed over to former US President Donald Trump. In this Statement, The board said it was appropriate to restrict access to the account, but it was not appropriate to suspend the officer with “indefinite and disrespectful punishment.” As a result, the board requested that Facebook “review the matter” in order to justify a proportional response consistent with the agency’s rules.

The board said in its inquiry that the “indefinite” suspension was “inappropriate” and that “Facebook is not allowed to keep any user off the platform indefinitely.” It added that Facebook’s moderators did not follow any existing procedures and the indefinite suspension did not specify the company’s terms of service. It said Facebook had a responsibility to “create necessary and proportional penalties” for dealing with serious violations of the rules.

On January 6, 2021, a group of protesters attacked the US Capitol Building with the aim of reporting the closure of the 2020 general election certificate. Trump, earlier in the day, delivered a speech urging VP Mike Pence to “do the right thing by closing the certificate.” He added that protesters should “fight like hell” or “you don’t have a country anymore.” Soon, officials will leave the Capitol building as rioters violate the perimeter, killing five people in the process, and Trump will post messages later condemning the violence but maintaining a position that the certificate is invalid.

January 19, Facebook and InstagramAs well as several other social media (then) imposed restrictions on the President. The fairness was that Trump’s postings could be seen as an incentive for more violence by leading to a temporary ban. Shortly afterwards, CEO Mark Zuckerberg wrote that “Trump wants to use the rest of his time in office to make a peaceful and lawful transfer of power to his elected successor.” He added that the ban on accessing his Facebook and Instagram pages “will be completed indefinitely and at least in the next two weeks under a peaceful transfer of power.”

On January 8, Twitter announced it Permanently suspended Donald Trump’s personal Twitter Accounts “Because of the risk of further incitement to violence.” The suspension was a reservoir, given The number of exceptions Which were already inlaid on multiple platforms. Before the 2011 election and during the presidency, Facebook received a waiver for content that would otherwise violate its acceptable use policy. CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he did not want to become Truth arbitrator, And said that the content “NewsworthyHe used to stay online. In mid-2020, the company revised its policy and stated that it would “.Labels“Content that violates its policy rather than deleting it – although it removed a post from Trump in mid-2020 COVID-19 Stamping incorrect information.

On January 21, Facebook mentioned the 2020-001-FB-FBR case number Board of Observation Both to rule on the suspension, and “to make policy recommendations on behalf of the board regarding the suspension where the user is a political leader.” In particular, Facebook has submitted the following two questions:

  1. Considering Facebook’s standards, especially its voice and security commitments, did it make the right decision in favor of Donald J. Trump’s indefinite ban on posting content on Facebook and Instagram?

  2. In addition to the board’s determination to maintain or raise the suspension indefinitely, Facebook users welcome the board’s observation or recommendation on suspension when they are political leaders.

The monitoring board said a five-member panel would investigate and decide on the matter, after which the decision was approved by a majority of members. Facebook said at the time that it would abide by the decision and was bound to implement the decision within seven days. That includes Trump, Has created its own platform As an extension of his own website, which we can publish without fear of restraint.

The board was initially committed to making a decision within 90 days of the referral, which was set for April 21. On April 16However, it said the verdict needed to be delayed in order to review “all comments” made about the case, as it received 9,666 during consultations. On Monday, May 3, the decision was announced May 5 at 9 a.m. ET.

In its ruling, the board said it agreed that the posts Trump made after the Capital riots “severely violated” the values ​​of the Facebook community. It said Trump’s remarks praising the rioters “violated Facebook’s rules to ban praise or support for people involved in violence.” It added that the claim that the election results were fraudulent was unfounded, adding that “Mr. Trump created an environment where there was a serious risk of violence.”

Facebook blockers say whatever the Oversight Board decides, the whole thing was a public relations move. Real oversight board, A group that represents several critics of the social network, said the verdict was a “smokescreen”. In a statement, Published MondayIt said the board was a “Facebook-payable, body-designated body set by Facebook to make the most politically sensitive decisions by Facebook.” Used as a model for other authoritarian leaders to abuse Facebook. He should be banned forever. ”

The Overtight Board seems to agree on this point, “Since applying a vague, disrespectful penalty and then referring the matter to the Board for resolution, Facebook seeks to avoid its responsibilities.” It added that it “rejected Facebook’s request and insisted that Facebook could enforce and impose a set fine.”

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