Help! Am I talking to my classmates?


Oh dear

I am a medium work boss and I love my coworkers. I’m worried, though I’ve told them too much at times. I tend to wear my heart on my sleeves. Am I doing wrong when I’m not terribly isolated?

California

Any suggestions columnist or at least the most interesting question or This Consultant columnist, super-specific situation with which I cannot relate at all. Snacking In your office? A colleague Accepting credit Did you write for the newsletter? I have never experienced these situations and do not feel very strong feelings about them, which is a good recipe for serving as an expert and for rating on the internet! The critical distance caused by unfamiliarity can be extraordinarily helpful in forming thoughts that may be valuable to the other person. Once I lose it, I fear that I will be dealing with WIRED.com’s own issues instead of just the therapist’s office.

In California, the exact opposite of the situation I can’t relate to. It is a question that strikes at the center of all my uncertainty about how to best manage, how to be a good colleague, how to be the best person in the world. I hate this question, because it is my question, and because I can’t firmly cosplay as an expert and thus have no choice but to express myself as a threatening fool who is making everything go with me. (All my past / present / future direct reports, please stop reading now))

With this bad support for my qualifications, let’s dive in. After reading your question more than once, its owners who discuss a fair number of pulses, I feel very confident about an adoption: you are a very good managing manager who leans towards honesty and sincerity. It’s rare to think about how they’re impacting their people, and your employees are lucky.

Transparency and openness of mind – however, they must be handled with caution. And none of us are balancing all the time. Thinking critically about this is the only way to keep your batting average, so you’re doing great.

If you don’t say that if you feel bad about sharing that kind of information, then annoy me, for a moment, I go back … to me. I don’t like it very much when it comes to honesty in my relationship with someone who is credibly described as a “terrible liar” and “completely insect-free”. But like you, I sometimes share your concerns about whether I go too far. Everyone said they like transparency from their boss but not all information is the same and can be more destructive than some helpers.

I’m going to assume that, like me, your pressures often come when there is a debate about whether to disclose information about the chaos that occurs above your employees ’pay grades. Suppose you are fighting Yours The boss about changes that might affect the people you report (a completely speculative situation with which I have nothing to do) Direct experience). It doesn’t feel great to hide things from your employees when they go blind after doing it, but you want to protect them from premature panic. I think the key question is why do you want to share information. Will your people actually benefit from knowing? Will it prepare them for a better-informed decision, or something to come down the line? Or will it put pressure on them at the expense of their own emotional security? They are when I honestly regret not fully considering how the person I’m talking to will be affected.

This is complicated, although if you have multiple direct reports, each of them will respond differently to new information. I’ve worked with some people who know when they do best That’s right How sausages are made, and some who are too risky in freakouts to handle anything that doesn’t set in stone. And offices are gossipy places, so telling your less-anxious reports will often always come back to more anxious people. It makes you play in a way that makes you more anxious, so think carefully about which version of the story you feel comfortable with. Everyone Know based on who you are talking to and adapt your distribution.



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *